Hey, good lookin’…

During this citywide soccer-canceling, wet and wild storm it’s hard to believe that just a few short weeks ago it was 80 to 90 degrees. Back then I was taking note of street trees that had come through the heat of summer looking kinda crispy and brown.

Snowbells, Styrax sp., were among them.

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It looks badly neglected, but not so.  The homeowner wondered what could be done to help these poor trees diligently watered and still not flourishing after more than 5 years.

Plenty of katsura, Cerdiciphyllum japonicum, were looking fine but despite the presence of the water bags, these weren’t among them.

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Hawthorns never look their best at the end of summer.  (Flowering crabapples too, I noticed were lacking in lushness.) Poor things drop their leaves before they even have a chance to turn color. Or were they there to begin with?

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By contrast, here are a couple trees at the other end of the scale — looking great after a long dry season:

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Attractive silvery foliage with the orange berries on a small tree/large shrub.  Can you believe this fruit load?

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Not a tree I see very often around here, but familiar to me from one behind the Alberta Food Co-op:

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Looks to be sea-buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides. Deciduous, hardy to USDA zone 3, tolerant of drought and poor soil conditions. Male and female flowers on separate individuals, both needed to produce fruit. More about this tree at Temperate Climate Permaculture.

Here’s another unusual tree that caught my attention recently.

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An evergreen oak, not one I’ve seen anywhere else.

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Looking for clues…

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Aha…

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Can’t find any information about this tree.

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But it is beautiful with bright, shiny foliage.

Excuse the blurry shots taken on a windy day, but the new red-tinted growth is so striking.

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If you know something about this tree, please share in a comment.  Thanks!

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